bushnowon
street
urban
mtbo
Run or walk, compete against yourself or others, or just for a family day out. The bush series caters for all in the great outdoors. (April-Nov)
Run, walk or push a pram to a 45 minute time limit. How many points can you get? (Oct-Mar)
Preparation for the Bush. Try out bush style orienteering in local parks before stepping out into the bush. Also includes a night event for the adventurous. (Feb-April)
Grab your mountain bike and ride around bush tracks in either a street style event, bush style event or a combination of the two. (Oct-Mar)
 

 

1. The Course

The course is a 45 minute score course, (i.e competitors visit as many controls as they can, in any order, in 45 minutes).

2. Preparation Time

Competitors will receive their map 2 minutes before their start time.

3. Late Penalties

a. Minus 30 points for every minute or part thereof up to 5 minutes late.
b. Minus 30 points for every 30 seconds or part thereof from 5 minutes late onward, down to a score of 50 points or until 10 minutes late.
c. If more than 10 minutes late, the score will be 50 points.

4. Early Bonuses

If all controls have been visited then plus 20 points for every full minute early.

5. Technology Failures

It is the competitor’s responsibility to make sure that their technology is charged and working.

6. Private Property

All private property and any other areas so marked on the map are out of bounds. Competitors found not observing this rule can be disqualified. (And remember that competitor’s tracks can easily be viewed via MapRun!)

7. Duty of Care

a. Before going out on the course all competitors must report to the Registration Desk (so that we know who is out on the course).
b. On completing the course all competitors must again report to the Registration Desk (so that search parties are not sent out!)

c. In entering an orienteering event, competitors recognise that the activity has certain inherent risks due to its conduct in the urban and natural environments. Included in these risks are injury due to rough terrain and obstacles and the effects of heat, cold and exhaustion. Competitors are also aware that there is no personal accident insurance on their participation in the sport and that they take part at their own risk. The Full Policy is available here (pdf)

8. Individual Event Scoring

Placings are determined by (in order):

a. The largest number of points scored.
b. The least number of penalties incurred.
c. The least time taken.

9. Categories

a. Individual competitors (over the age of 14) will compete in one of the Men, Women or Walker categories.
b. One person pushing a child in a pram (and possibly accompanied by other children) can instead compete in the Pram category. 
c. Groups of two or more (one of whom has to be over the age of 14) must compete in the Team category. Teams are to stay together (i.e. within sight of each other) at all times while competing. In terms of the overall Series, teams with at least two members in common will be regarded as the same team.

10. Awards

a. The Totally Committed (TC) Award  (or the Toblerone Chocolate Award)

For attending, either as a participant or a course setter, all 17 events in the season.

b. The General Classification (GC) Award

For the competitor with the highest series total.

The series total is determined by summing the competitor’s ten best results over the season. (Note: No points are given for course setting.) 

In calculating the series total, the results from each event are normalised via the formula

GC Formula

There is a GC award for each category (i.e. Men, Women, Walk, Pram and Team).

c. The Efficiency Index (EI) Award

For the competitor with the highest series Efficiency Index.

At an individual event a competitor’s EI is the ratio of points scored to distance travelled. 

The series EI is determined by summing the competitor’s ten best results over the season. In calculating the series EI, the EI results from each event are normalised, (via a formula similar to that used for the GC Award).

d. The Consistently Average (CA) Award

For the competitor with the best series Consistently Average score. 

At an individual event a competitor’s CA score is the number of points the competitor’s result is away from the average of the best and worst result at that event. So, for this event, the lower the CA score the better the score is.

However, in calculating the series CA score, the CA results from each event are normalised via a formula:

 CA1 Formula

This means that the CA normalised scores range from 105 down to 5, with 105 being the best score. The series CA score is determined by summing the competitor’s ten best results over the season.

There is a CA award for both the Men’s category and the Women’s category. 

e. The Alternating Controls (AC) Award

For the competitor with the highest series Alternating Controls score.

At an individual event a competitor’s AC score is the number of points scored before either consecutive even controls or consecutive odd controls are visited.

The series AC is determined by summing the competitor’s ten best results over the season. In calculating the series AC score, the AC results from each event are normalised, (via a formula similar to that used for the GC Award).

There is an AC award for each of the Men, Women and Walk categories 

f. The InZone (IZ) Award

For the competitor with the highest series InZone score.

At an individual event a competitor’s IZ score is the number of points scored before a control outside the InZone is visited. However, if all controls in the InZone have been visited then subsequent controls visited outside the InZone will be contribute to the IZ score.

The series IZ is determined by summing the competitor’s ten best results over the season. In calculating the series IZ score, the IZ results from each event are normalised, (via a formula similar to that used for the GC Award).

There is an IZ award for each of the Men, Women and Walk categories

 
 
 
 

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